Category Archive: Academics & Artists

Academic Nook: [Some of] The Books that Make up the Life of Ninotchka Rosca

It is truly an honor to welcome the one, the only, the formidable Madam Ninotchka Rosca here in GatheringBooks for our Academic Nook as we explore books/literature related to Girl Power and Women’s Wiles – our theme this March until the first week of May. Madam, we send you our warmest welcome and we thank …

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Academic Nook: Haunting Truths (or Love, Life and Light From Stories of Demons, Decay and Darkness) by Mitch Ong

Haunting Truths or Love, Life and Light From Stories of Demons, Decay and Darkness By Mitch Ong As a child, Friday was the highlight of my week. Like all other children, it meant the end of the school week for me, and I could forget all of the books for at least one night. But …

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Academic Nook: My Life Refuses to Rhyme – by Alwin Aguirre, PhD Cand.

Like the average child in the Philippines, I never had that many books when I was small. By books I mean those that I would have wanted to read outside school or those that I would have really wanted to own and see everyday and read and read and read again, and again. And dream …

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Academic Nook: The Epexegetical and Pernicious Dahl by Dr Joseph Palis

He is viewed as magical by some, while others think of words like “cruel” to describe his stories. Whether his type of storytelling is humorous or mean-spirited, Roald Dahl still manages to be both at once.

Academic Nook: Done Kissing Frogs by Tuting Hernandez

Growing up in rural Philippines, where folk tales are part of everyday life and where the fantastic and the ordinary meld in a cosmos of danger and beauty, where were-creatures and spirits lurk in every corner, where the physical and the spiritual worlds are one, my early childhood was full of excitement, adventure, and uninterrupted …

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Academic Nook: How to tell a book by its cover: The changing (out)looks of books by Esther Joosa, Ph.D. Cand.

We have to accept that the face of literacy practices and reading are changing. Gone are the days that literacy in the traditional sense of the word is restricted to being fluent in reading, writing and speaking.

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